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Hey guys!

So, I’m starting my blog back up again! I’ve always loved blogging; I genuinely have no idea why I stopped! So frustrating. Anyhow, I’m thinking about maybe going back into education which is pretty exciting!

I miss studying and learning new things everyday and meeting all kinds of wonderful people - dropping out of Southampton was the right thing for me to do at the time. I mean, I didn’t have a life there at all. I didn’t bond with my fellow freshers as I was supposed to and I was so incredibly homesick that it just got me really down; I put on a tonne of weight and just hid inside my room watching House and eating noodles. Not a way to live!

However, I’m in a much better place in my life and within myself. I feel like I’ve really grown as a person and that University this time round would be no where near as daunting nor overwhelming.

I need to get back into the habit of writing and critiquing fashion - This is where the blog comes in! It will be kind of a mixed bag: I’ll be giving my opinions of current trends, reviewing beauty products and showcasing things that I design and make. I hope to be starting a few sketchbooks and I’ll scan them in showing my research and design process. Maybe even tutorials and uploading patterns and order of manufactures, maybe? I don’t know, I haven’t fully decided where this blog will take me. Hopefully, onwards and upwards!

If Grammar is the Key to Critical Thinking, the Idea of a Style Guide is to minimise the Ratio of Nonsense to Sense.

Grammar is essential in understanding language. Without it, sentences would not have correct structure, and phrases can be easily taken out of context. Syntax is a major part of grammar –a set of linguistic rules that help to give written work meaning. Critical thinking is a personal analysis of something, be it literature, a problem etc. The deconstruction of text is where the reader finds an interpretation of what is written, rather than taking the words as they are and the direct meaning they give. How a person understands a piece of writing depends entirely on grammar and the use of it.  

A Style Guide is similar to grammar, but on a larger scale. It provides the guidelines and structure for a group of people writing for a collective piece. Without these rules, writers may use different words or abbreviations for different meanings, which could confuse and mislead the person reading.  Examples of writers following a Style Guide are in newspapers and magazines. However, these rules are not fixed for everyone and are usually specified to each specific publication. The Guardian newspaper is known for having a very well respected Style Guide and, after publishing it as a book and on the internet, it has become a strongly followed set of rules for many publications and writers.

The Times have also published their Style Guide as a book and on the internet. However, the most recent edition of their book was published in 2003 and is not seen as highly regarded as The Guardian’s.

It is not uncommon for a lack or misuse of grammar to make a piece of writing mean one thing to some individuals, and raise an entirely different issue with others.  Certain people use words which, over time, have been made to feel as though they mean something other than what they actually do, due to the way it has been used in sentences and the grammar surrounding it. For example, the word ‘instant’ traditionally means immediately, without hesitation, though in more modern times, because of the context it is being used in, makes the word seem like it actually means ‘quick’ e.g., in food products like Smash. It’s a commonly used misconception. However, in a Style Guide, words like ‘instant’ will have a fixed meaning for all writers of the publication. It eliminates the chance of the reader getting the wrong impression of what is trying to be communicated.  

Some writers take the rules of grammar and purposely misuse them as part of their work. This is more often seen in poetry, as the regular rules of literature do not necessarily apply, and can be altered to create or enhance their art. Poet E.E Cummings is famous for his lack of punctuation in his work. The poem “i carry your heart(i carry it in” is one of his most recognised pieces and contains little punctuation which is often incorrectly used and/or placed. The beginning of the poem:

i carry your heart with me(i carry it in
my heart)i am never without it(anywhere
i go you go,my dear;and whatever is done
by only me is your doing,my darling)
                                            i fear
no fate(for you are my fate,my sweet)i want
no world(for beautiful you are my world,my true)
and it’s you are whatever a moon has always meant
and whatever a sun will always sing is you

The rules of grammar are non-existent. The references to himself through personal nouns are not capitalised and spaces are not used to separate words or the little punctuation that is used. However, this misuse of punctuation helps with the tone of the poem. “whatever is done by only me is your doing” gives the impression that this is him bearing his all to his love and that on his own, there are no rules, no structure, nothing to follow, and that he needs his ‘darling’ because everything he does is for her. Cummings needs the reader to know how he feels about whoever it is he is writing for and literally spills the words onto paper. A spillage has no format; it flows freely, stopping and starting wherever it wishes, much like the structure of his work.

Language is very adaptable and some people who aren’t necessarily writers see the potential that it has. Every day conversation can use the structure of writing to give a similar impression to what literature does. For example, innuendo is a form of critical thinking. Taking the words that are being said out loud and mentally adapting them to mean something else, changing the context of the phrase entirely. Riddles are a creative way of expressing something via language. The idea is to not think about the words as a whole, but the separate connotations the different parts mean.

A common ‘puzzle’ on the internet is one where there is a paragraph of writing where all the letters in the word are in the wrong order apart from the first and last letter. For example: “Iesantd of benig wrettin in sntaardd Elnsgih, the barin has to rreanrgae the leretts for it to mkae sesne”, which translates to ‘Instead of being written in standard English, the brain has to rearrange the letters for it to make sense’.  This is not a misuse of grammar as such, but it does show how adaptable language is and that sometimes, even the nonsense makes sense.

In saying that, however, a Style Guide is as essential to a publication as grammar is necessary to the English language. They eliminate any chances of miscommunication through an understanding of the basic rules of literature. With publications such as newspapers, their aim isn’t to puzzle the mind with riddles or confess its undying love through poetry. Their focus is to give the readers what they buy their paper for: news. A Style Guide tends to adhere to the audience to which its publication is writing to address and the language they use matches that of their readers. Little confusion can be made when guidelines are followed and set rules are in place.

2010: Designs for Paparazzi Brief

2010: Photography for Paparazzi Brief

2010: Photography for Paparazzi Brief

2010: Satin suit made for Paparazzi Brief, catwalk.

2010: Satin suit made for Paparazzi Brief, catwalk.

(Source: kimberleylouisemillerdesigns)

2010: Dress made for Paparazzi Brief, catwalk.

2010: Dress made for Paparazzi Brief, catwalk.

(Source: kimberleylouisemillerdesigns)

Profile Piece: Catherine Wright.

Written November 2011.

Sitting in the middle of Bedford Place (Southampton) is Hepwrights, a vintage shop, selling a variety of clothing and accessories from previous decades. Although many shops surround it, there is a certain charm to the shop that forces you to look inside. The shop itself is comforting; the deep green colour of the carpet, the buzz of the customers, the positioning of the lighting. Rated as one of the best vintage boutiques in the South, Hepwrights offers more than a simple shopping experience. Here, these clothes have lives, stories of how they got to where they are.

Catherine stands at the front of the room, head to toe in vintage clothing; a maroon Windsmoor skirt, a long flowing crepe lace jacket and a beautiful hand crafted necklace, which was originally a brooch, adapted by one of her suppliers. It is obvious she takes pride in her appearance. “I cannot help but express myself through clothes,” she beams. “It’s just who I am.”

She is an expressive character and even describes herself as eccentric and sharp, saying she has similar characteristics to those of a Spaniel; excitable, interested in everything, full of life and energy. She shows this in how she presents herself, using hand gestures when she speaks and sighing heavily with wide eyes before explaining a long winded story.

She is pleasant to talk to and a joy to watch. She’s infectious. Even when talking about harder times in her life she emphasises how overcoming those times made her a stronger, braver person and how light can always come out of the dark.

        “Life just throws shit at you sometimes, doesn’t it?”

Catherine started her business 7 years ago. The reason she was open to a change in her life was due to having just recovered from severe depression. The tone of her voices lowers slightly as describes how the disease affected her. “With most people who go through trauma, there tends to be a before and an after.” But battling her issues helped her overcome new fears. “I wouldn’t have been brave enough to do it otherwise,” she insists.

She and a friend, Donna, decided that between the two of them, they had enough clothes that they didn’t wear that it made sense to sell them on to people who would appreciate the beautiful pieces of clothing that were just gathering dust in their wardrobes. ‘A Lass Too Fat’ was one of the original names for the business, as that was the main reason - they believed - for the clothes to be sold. However, they settled with the name ‘Spy Baby Vintage’. And that’s where it all kicked off. With a budget of £250 and Donna’s spare bedroom, Spy Baby Vintage was steadily materialising.

As all successful companies do, it expanded. “First, we moved into my front room but there wasn’t enough room there either. So we moved into the basement of my friend’s coffee shop,” Catherine recollects. She never intended on owning a shop and wanted the business to be online. But as soon as the customers upstairs learnt what was beneath the floorboards, they couldn’t resist taking a look.

“To begin with, I said the clothes weren’t for sale, but I gave in. Most of the time we hadn’t even worked out a price so if a woman came to me asking how much, I would say, maybe, £120 for a skirt and if they replied ‘Bargain!’ I remember thinking ‘Damn, I should have priced it higher!’ ”

They stayed in the basement for about a year, until one day, not too long after they officially put a sign up announcing themselves to the public; the owner asked them to leave. “It was only temporary,” admits Catherine.

And as they left the basement, Donna left the company. “She’s a musician,” Catherine clarifies, “This was more a hobby for her, where it was something I wanted to do full time.” Although the partnership ended, Catherine still respected Donna’s wishes. “She asked me to change the name. ‘Spy Baby Vintage’ was our project.”

 This is where ‘Hepwrights’ came into play. “I wanted something classic,” she explains, “So I took ‘Hep’ from Katherine and Audrey Hepburn and also the Hep Cats,” which instantly says a lot about her style and taste. She rented a small office space, and although she planned on staying online, held an open door sale once a month.

But then life got dark again for Catherine. Between 2007 and 2008, both of her children fell ill, her house burned down and she was in two separate car accidents. The strength she shows whilst talking about this time is astounding. Having lost the majority of her possessions, she had to rebuild her life again from scratch. The only thing she had intact was her business.

After two years of being in the office space, Catherine decided to start looking for a shop. “I started put all my energy and focus into the open door sale and public buyers. I would have one, and then spend the month planning the next.”

She signed the lease on 34 Bedford Place, Southampton on September 27th 2010. Having just celebrated it’s first birthday, Hepwrights is constantly moving forward, from a homemade business to one of the best vintage stores of the south. The combination of the clothes and the atmosphere and of course, the lovely Catherine Wright, makes Hepwrights a shopping experience to remember.

She sees her store as more of an adoption agency. “Each piece fits one person. The sizes vary in vintage clothing, the woman’s shape were entirely different.” And she knows the story behind practically every piece of clothing in the store, which is helped by having private suppliers where everything is sourced within Hampshire.

Visit her website http://hepwrights.com/ or follow her on Twitter @hepvintage. And if you’re ever in Southampton, pop in and say hello. Catherine herself makes the journey worthwhile.

image

Why should women be paid equal to men? Men have been in the working world a lot longer and deserve to be paid at a higher rate. Heck, I’m a working mom and I’m not paid a dime. I depend on my husband to provide for me and my family, as should most women… and if a woman does work, she should be happy just to be out there in the working world and quit complaining that she’s not making as much as her male counterparts. I mean really, all this wanting to be equal nonsense is going to be detrimental to the future of women everywhere. Who’s going to want to hire a woman, or for that matter, even marry a woman who thinks she is the same, if not better than a man at any job. It’s almost laughable. C’mon now ladies, are you with me on this?

Ann Romney, wife of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney

[Source]

(via mr-charles)

She is not an actual woman. This enrages me beyond belief.

(via grimmble)

Wow. I mean … Wow

(via doylemb)

This is outrageous. Even if I could justify what she’s saying, which I can’t, it’s the fact she’s the wife of a presidential candidate that gets me. 

If Americans make a HUGE mistake and actually vote Romney in as President, this woman is going to be one of the most powerful and potentially influential women in the country. How is society going to see past misogynistic views when the USA’s First Lady shares chauvinistic male opinions?

(Source: gaywrites, via doylemb)

The Vanity Fair Oscars Afterparty: Males?

I say males. The only person who stuck out for me in the ‘Men’s Catagory’ was Gerard Butler.

Donning an immaculate Ferragamo suit, Butler looked pristine and healthy at the after party. The reason I’m drawn to him in particular is that I am a fan of his work and am very happy to see that he’s back on his feet after a stint in rehab and looks as though he’s doing well. Commendable. 

Anyway, the couples segment will feature more of the mens’ attire. 

Until then,

The Vanity Fair Oscars Afterparty.

So, my favourite part of the awards season is understandably the red carpet. But for the Oscars, this year, I felt the best looks took place at the Vanity Fair Afterparty.

My top five female looks:

Emma Stone in Chanel. Very popular style for the Oscars this year. Many dresses had black sheer detailing.

Michelle Rodriguez in a beautiful black, embellished dress. Designer unknown. Trust me, I looked everywhere.

Lily Collins in Monique Lhuillier. The base colour of this dress against her skin tone is flawless; she looks practically painted. Beautiful.

Selena Gomez in Dolce and Gabbana. The embellishments on this dress are stunning and the cut of the neckline suits her perfectly. The sheer fabric in panels at the bottom give more flair and volume to the standard fishtail cut. Moved beautifully.

Kate Hudson in Versace. Now, I know that the front of this dress was impressive, but the back was breathtaking. The detailing of the curves are so precise and the point at the small of the back is flawless. Such an interesting asymmetric design.


I will do both the males and the couples looks tomorrow. I’m tired and I spent about three hours trying to find out who designer Michelle Rodriguez’ dress.

Caio.

Atypical.

You see, this is what I look like when I’m generally going about my business. My skirt has holes in it, my fake leather jacket is literally being held together with safety pins and my hair severely needs dying. I also wear too much eye liner and boys t-shirts. 

People always look at me strange when I say I’m a fashion journalism student - they looked at me with utter bewilderment when I was just a fashion student, so mild improvement - but I think because of how I look, people don’t take me seriously. Which personally, I find really offensive. I work just as hard as the next girl, and I get over looked. Not just for with this either. In general, work placements, job interviews etc.

It’s how I feel comfortable though, so I’d rather look like this and be happy then dress like everyone else and feel so incredibly awkward. I guess I just need to push myself harder. 

Wish me luck,

Hey guys!

So, I’m starting my blog back up again! I’ve always loved blogging; I genuinely have no idea why I stopped! So frustrating. Anyhow, I’m thinking about maybe going back into education which is pretty exciting!

I miss studying and learning new things everyday and meeting all kinds of wonderful people - dropping out of Southampton was the right thing for me to do at the time. I mean, I didn’t have a life there at all. I didn’t bond with my fellow freshers as I was supposed to and I was so incredibly homesick that it just got me really down; I put on a tonne of weight and just hid inside my room watching House and eating noodles. Not a way to live!

However, I’m in a much better place in my life and within myself. I feel like I’ve really grown as a person and that University this time round would be no where near as daunting nor overwhelming.

I need to get back into the habit of writing and critiquing fashion - This is where the blog comes in! It will be kind of a mixed bag: I’ll be giving my opinions of current trends, reviewing beauty products and showcasing things that I design and make. I hope to be starting a few sketchbooks and I’ll scan them in showing my research and design process. Maybe even tutorials and uploading patterns and order of manufactures, maybe? I don’t know, I haven’t fully decided where this blog will take me. Hopefully, onwards and upwards!

If Grammar is the Key to Critical Thinking, the Idea of a Style Guide is to minimise the Ratio of Nonsense to Sense.

Grammar is essential in understanding language. Without it, sentences would not have correct structure, and phrases can be easily taken out of context. Syntax is a major part of grammar –a set of linguistic rules that help to give written work meaning. Critical thinking is a personal analysis of something, be it literature, a problem etc. The deconstruction of text is where the reader finds an interpretation of what is written, rather than taking the words as they are and the direct meaning they give. How a person understands a piece of writing depends entirely on grammar and the use of it.  

A Style Guide is similar to grammar, but on a larger scale. It provides the guidelines and structure for a group of people writing for a collective piece. Without these rules, writers may use different words or abbreviations for different meanings, which could confuse and mislead the person reading.  Examples of writers following a Style Guide are in newspapers and magazines. However, these rules are not fixed for everyone and are usually specified to each specific publication. The Guardian newspaper is known for having a very well respected Style Guide and, after publishing it as a book and on the internet, it has become a strongly followed set of rules for many publications and writers.

The Times have also published their Style Guide as a book and on the internet. However, the most recent edition of their book was published in 2003 and is not seen as highly regarded as The Guardian’s.

It is not uncommon for a lack or misuse of grammar to make a piece of writing mean one thing to some individuals, and raise an entirely different issue with others.  Certain people use words which, over time, have been made to feel as though they mean something other than what they actually do, due to the way it has been used in sentences and the grammar surrounding it. For example, the word ‘instant’ traditionally means immediately, without hesitation, though in more modern times, because of the context it is being used in, makes the word seem like it actually means ‘quick’ e.g., in food products like Smash. It’s a commonly used misconception. However, in a Style Guide, words like ‘instant’ will have a fixed meaning for all writers of the publication. It eliminates the chance of the reader getting the wrong impression of what is trying to be communicated.  

Some writers take the rules of grammar and purposely misuse them as part of their work. This is more often seen in poetry, as the regular rules of literature do not necessarily apply, and can be altered to create or enhance their art. Poet E.E Cummings is famous for his lack of punctuation in his work. The poem “i carry your heart(i carry it in” is one of his most recognised pieces and contains little punctuation which is often incorrectly used and/or placed. The beginning of the poem:

i carry your heart with me(i carry it in
my heart)i am never without it(anywhere
i go you go,my dear;and whatever is done
by only me is your doing,my darling)
                                            i fear
no fate(for you are my fate,my sweet)i want
no world(for beautiful you are my world,my true)
and it’s you are whatever a moon has always meant
and whatever a sun will always sing is you

The rules of grammar are non-existent. The references to himself through personal nouns are not capitalised and spaces are not used to separate words or the little punctuation that is used. However, this misuse of punctuation helps with the tone of the poem. “whatever is done by only me is your doing” gives the impression that this is him bearing his all to his love and that on his own, there are no rules, no structure, nothing to follow, and that he needs his ‘darling’ because everything he does is for her. Cummings needs the reader to know how he feels about whoever it is he is writing for and literally spills the words onto paper. A spillage has no format; it flows freely, stopping and starting wherever it wishes, much like the structure of his work.

Language is very adaptable and some people who aren’t necessarily writers see the potential that it has. Every day conversation can use the structure of writing to give a similar impression to what literature does. For example, innuendo is a form of critical thinking. Taking the words that are being said out loud and mentally adapting them to mean something else, changing the context of the phrase entirely. Riddles are a creative way of expressing something via language. The idea is to not think about the words as a whole, but the separate connotations the different parts mean.

A common ‘puzzle’ on the internet is one where there is a paragraph of writing where all the letters in the word are in the wrong order apart from the first and last letter. For example: “Iesantd of benig wrettin in sntaardd Elnsgih, the barin has to rreanrgae the leretts for it to mkae sesne”, which translates to ‘Instead of being written in standard English, the brain has to rearrange the letters for it to make sense’.  This is not a misuse of grammar as such, but it does show how adaptable language is and that sometimes, even the nonsense makes sense.

In saying that, however, a Style Guide is as essential to a publication as grammar is necessary to the English language. They eliminate any chances of miscommunication through an understanding of the basic rules of literature. With publications such as newspapers, their aim isn’t to puzzle the mind with riddles or confess its undying love through poetry. Their focus is to give the readers what they buy their paper for: news. A Style Guide tends to adhere to the audience to which its publication is writing to address and the language they use matches that of their readers. Little confusion can be made when guidelines are followed and set rules are in place.

2010: Designs for Paparazzi Brief

2010: Photography for Paparazzi Brief

2010: Photography for Paparazzi Brief

2010: Satin suit made for Paparazzi Brief, catwalk.

2010: Satin suit made for Paparazzi Brief, catwalk.

(Source: kimberleylouisemillerdesigns)

2010: Dress made for Paparazzi Brief, catwalk.

2010: Dress made for Paparazzi Brief, catwalk.

(Source: kimberleylouisemillerdesigns)

Profile Piece: Catherine Wright.

Written November 2011.

Sitting in the middle of Bedford Place (Southampton) is Hepwrights, a vintage shop, selling a variety of clothing and accessories from previous decades. Although many shops surround it, there is a certain charm to the shop that forces you to look inside. The shop itself is comforting; the deep green colour of the carpet, the buzz of the customers, the positioning of the lighting. Rated as one of the best vintage boutiques in the South, Hepwrights offers more than a simple shopping experience. Here, these clothes have lives, stories of how they got to where they are.

Catherine stands at the front of the room, head to toe in vintage clothing; a maroon Windsmoor skirt, a long flowing crepe lace jacket and a beautiful hand crafted necklace, which was originally a brooch, adapted by one of her suppliers. It is obvious she takes pride in her appearance. “I cannot help but express myself through clothes,” she beams. “It’s just who I am.”

She is an expressive character and even describes herself as eccentric and sharp, saying she has similar characteristics to those of a Spaniel; excitable, interested in everything, full of life and energy. She shows this in how she presents herself, using hand gestures when she speaks and sighing heavily with wide eyes before explaining a long winded story.

She is pleasant to talk to and a joy to watch. She’s infectious. Even when talking about harder times in her life she emphasises how overcoming those times made her a stronger, braver person and how light can always come out of the dark.

        “Life just throws shit at you sometimes, doesn’t it?”

Catherine started her business 7 years ago. The reason she was open to a change in her life was due to having just recovered from severe depression. The tone of her voices lowers slightly as describes how the disease affected her. “With most people who go through trauma, there tends to be a before and an after.” But battling her issues helped her overcome new fears. “I wouldn’t have been brave enough to do it otherwise,” she insists.

She and a friend, Donna, decided that between the two of them, they had enough clothes that they didn’t wear that it made sense to sell them on to people who would appreciate the beautiful pieces of clothing that were just gathering dust in their wardrobes. ‘A Lass Too Fat’ was one of the original names for the business, as that was the main reason - they believed - for the clothes to be sold. However, they settled with the name ‘Spy Baby Vintage’. And that’s where it all kicked off. With a budget of £250 and Donna’s spare bedroom, Spy Baby Vintage was steadily materialising.

As all successful companies do, it expanded. “First, we moved into my front room but there wasn’t enough room there either. So we moved into the basement of my friend’s coffee shop,” Catherine recollects. She never intended on owning a shop and wanted the business to be online. But as soon as the customers upstairs learnt what was beneath the floorboards, they couldn’t resist taking a look.

“To begin with, I said the clothes weren’t for sale, but I gave in. Most of the time we hadn’t even worked out a price so if a woman came to me asking how much, I would say, maybe, £120 for a skirt and if they replied ‘Bargain!’ I remember thinking ‘Damn, I should have priced it higher!’ ”

They stayed in the basement for about a year, until one day, not too long after they officially put a sign up announcing themselves to the public; the owner asked them to leave. “It was only temporary,” admits Catherine.

And as they left the basement, Donna left the company. “She’s a musician,” Catherine clarifies, “This was more a hobby for her, where it was something I wanted to do full time.” Although the partnership ended, Catherine still respected Donna’s wishes. “She asked me to change the name. ‘Spy Baby Vintage’ was our project.”

 This is where ‘Hepwrights’ came into play. “I wanted something classic,” she explains, “So I took ‘Hep’ from Katherine and Audrey Hepburn and also the Hep Cats,” which instantly says a lot about her style and taste. She rented a small office space, and although she planned on staying online, held an open door sale once a month.

But then life got dark again for Catherine. Between 2007 and 2008, both of her children fell ill, her house burned down and she was in two separate car accidents. The strength she shows whilst talking about this time is astounding. Having lost the majority of her possessions, she had to rebuild her life again from scratch. The only thing she had intact was her business.

After two years of being in the office space, Catherine decided to start looking for a shop. “I started put all my energy and focus into the open door sale and public buyers. I would have one, and then spend the month planning the next.”

She signed the lease on 34 Bedford Place, Southampton on September 27th 2010. Having just celebrated it’s first birthday, Hepwrights is constantly moving forward, from a homemade business to one of the best vintage stores of the south. The combination of the clothes and the atmosphere and of course, the lovely Catherine Wright, makes Hepwrights a shopping experience to remember.

She sees her store as more of an adoption agency. “Each piece fits one person. The sizes vary in vintage clothing, the woman’s shape were entirely different.” And she knows the story behind practically every piece of clothing in the store, which is helped by having private suppliers where everything is sourced within Hampshire.

Visit her website http://hepwrights.com/ or follow her on Twitter @hepvintage. And if you’re ever in Southampton, pop in and say hello. Catherine herself makes the journey worthwhile.

image

Why should women be paid equal to men? Men have been in the working world a lot longer and deserve to be paid at a higher rate. Heck, I’m a working mom and I’m not paid a dime. I depend on my husband to provide for me and my family, as should most women… and if a woman does work, she should be happy just to be out there in the working world and quit complaining that she’s not making as much as her male counterparts. I mean really, all this wanting to be equal nonsense is going to be detrimental to the future of women everywhere. Who’s going to want to hire a woman, or for that matter, even marry a woman who thinks she is the same, if not better than a man at any job. It’s almost laughable. C’mon now ladies, are you with me on this?

Ann Romney, wife of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney

[Source]

(via mr-charles)

She is not an actual woman. This enrages me beyond belief.

(via grimmble)

Wow. I mean … Wow

(via doylemb)

This is outrageous. Even if I could justify what she’s saying, which I can’t, it’s the fact she’s the wife of a presidential candidate that gets me. 

If Americans make a HUGE mistake and actually vote Romney in as President, this woman is going to be one of the most powerful and potentially influential women in the country. How is society going to see past misogynistic views when the USA’s First Lady shares chauvinistic male opinions?

(Source: gaywrites, via doylemb)

The Vanity Fair Oscars Afterparty: Males?

I say males. The only person who stuck out for me in the ‘Men’s Catagory’ was Gerard Butler.

Donning an immaculate Ferragamo suit, Butler looked pristine and healthy at the after party. The reason I’m drawn to him in particular is that I am a fan of his work and am very happy to see that he’s back on his feet after a stint in rehab and looks as though he’s doing well. Commendable. 

Anyway, the couples segment will feature more of the mens’ attire. 

Until then,

The Vanity Fair Oscars Afterparty.

So, my favourite part of the awards season is understandably the red carpet. But for the Oscars, this year, I felt the best looks took place at the Vanity Fair Afterparty.

My top five female looks:

Emma Stone in Chanel. Very popular style for the Oscars this year. Many dresses had black sheer detailing.

Michelle Rodriguez in a beautiful black, embellished dress. Designer unknown. Trust me, I looked everywhere.

Lily Collins in Monique Lhuillier. The base colour of this dress against her skin tone is flawless; she looks practically painted. Beautiful.

Selena Gomez in Dolce and Gabbana. The embellishments on this dress are stunning and the cut of the neckline suits her perfectly. The sheer fabric in panels at the bottom give more flair and volume to the standard fishtail cut. Moved beautifully.

Kate Hudson in Versace. Now, I know that the front of this dress was impressive, but the back was breathtaking. The detailing of the curves are so precise and the point at the small of the back is flawless. Such an interesting asymmetric design.


I will do both the males and the couples looks tomorrow. I’m tired and I spent about three hours trying to find out who designer Michelle Rodriguez’ dress.

Caio.

Atypical.

You see, this is what I look like when I’m generally going about my business. My skirt has holes in it, my fake leather jacket is literally being held together with safety pins and my hair severely needs dying. I also wear too much eye liner and boys t-shirts. 

People always look at me strange when I say I’m a fashion journalism student - they looked at me with utter bewilderment when I was just a fashion student, so mild improvement - but I think because of how I look, people don’t take me seriously. Which personally, I find really offensive. I work just as hard as the next girl, and I get over looked. Not just for with this either. In general, work placements, job interviews etc.

It’s how I feel comfortable though, so I’d rather look like this and be happy then dress like everyone else and feel so incredibly awkward. I guess I just need to push myself harder. 

Wish me luck,

Hey guys!
If Grammar is the Key to Critical Thinking, the Idea of a Style Guide is to minimise the Ratio of Nonsense to Sense.
Profile Piece: Catherine Wright.
"Why should women be paid equal to men? Men have been in the working world a lot longer and deserve to be paid at a higher rate. Heck, I’m a working mom and I’m not paid a dime. I depend on my husband to provide for me and my family, as should most women… and if a woman does work, she should be happy just to be out there in the working world and quit complaining that she’s not making as much as her male counterparts. I mean really, all this wanting to be equal nonsense is going to be detrimental to the future of women everywhere. Who’s going to want to hire a woman, or for that matter, even marry a woman who thinks she is the same, if not better than a man at any job. It’s almost laughable. C’mon now ladies, are you with me on this?"
The Vanity Fair Oscars Afterparty: Males?
The Vanity Fair Oscars Afterparty.
Atypical.

About:

Kimberley Louise Miller, 22.
Currently living in Leeds, England.
On this blog, I will be focusing on fashion and beauty - be it my own work; reviewing products; giving opinions on other designers.
This is both a collection of the work I have done over the past few years and a place for me to showcase my new ideas and how I plan to move forward.

Feel free to send any emails to:
kimberleylouisemiller@gmail.com

Thank you :)